Hair care

The
blow-out bars don’t offer cuts, colors, weaves or perms. Instead, it’s a
high concept that focuses on the feeling of a perfectly salon-styled
coif using only blow dryers, brushes and hairspray.

Laynie Snider, vice president at blo., 5850 N. Classen, says she likes to simply call it the style bar.

“We
just style hair,” she says. “Some people don’t know what a blow-out is,
but there are five different options. I like to make my blow-outs last
four to five days.”

When
it comes to hair, texture and characteristics of locks dictate the
haircare regimen. And since June, blo. has given women and men—yes, men
are welcome too—a few more hair-care options.

Toying with a somewhat antiquated ideal, blow-out bars have adopted hair rules from the past and put a fresh new spin on things.

“You know how your grandmother goes to the salon to get her hair done once a week? We’ve reinvented that idea,” Snider says.

Hot Air

The Classen Curve shopping center isn’t the only part of town graced
with a place to capture some voluminous locks. Dry/Shop, 1212 N. Walker,
opened in Midtown in July.

“I’d
always known I wanted to start a retail business but always envisioned
it just a clothing store,” says Emily Frosaker- Taylor, owner of
Dry/Shop. “I came across an article about the founder of a popular chain
of blow-dry bars. She actually started her business out of her car, and
it was a mobile blow-dry business.”

Frosaker-Taylor
wasted no time localizing the idea, albeit not in her car. She says
this was the perfect time for a highconcept, glamourous addition.

“I thought the concept was genius, and women all over the country were loving it,” she says. “It’s an affordable luxury.”

Keeping in line with blow-out bars around the nation, Dry/Shop does not offer cuts or colors.

ou
want your hair to feel easy, in this everyday shiny, floaty way—but in
reality, that’s not the easiest look to actually pull off every day,”
Frosaker-Taylor says. “So when people ask, ‘Why would you create a place
to just get your hair blow-dried?’ those of us who know just smile.
Because you won’t have to ask why after you try.”

Blown Away

Blow-outs
are geared toward a wellheeled clientele, with each style ranging from
$30-$150 for different types of blowouts, touch-ups and up-styles.

Dry/Shop
is the only Oklahoma shop to offer Blowpro hair products, a line from
the original NYC blow-dry bar, as well as House of Harlow, Michael
Lauren and Dolce Vita fashions and TokyoMilk fragrances.

“For
our frequent clients, we’ve got memberships,” Snider says. “It’s a
luxury, definitely something special, but I prefer it over a pedicure.”

Beyond
beauty and blow-outs, both bars plan on being active in the growing
communities surrounding them. Snider sees her shop fitting nicely into
the fabric of Classen Curve with its locally owned, upscale shops and
eateries.

“We’re
always going to try and keep it fun and active, just like the rest of
the Curve,” Snider says. “They’ve really set the bar.”

Frosaker-Taylor
is pleased to join new neighbors like Waffle Champion restaurant, and
the Osler Hotel and Edge Apartments, both under construction.

“The Midtown area is growing hugely,” she says. “I love the vibe and am excited about the other projects taking place.”

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